First Flowers of Spring!

IMG_7339

 

Popped up from the ground,

Tiny green stems holding up

White flower greetings!

 

********************

 

The start of every new spring season I always keenly await those first brave little bulb flowers who cheerily greet me with their delicate white faces.

Such a joyful sight to behold amid the backdrop of last year’s brown and dried vegetation.

Just now I went outside to capture some of their beauty to share with you.

I hope you like them!

The flower in the photo above is a snowdrop.

 

**********

 

These next ones are called “Glory in the Snow” and also “Striped Squill.”

(….the names I found as I was googling…..  🙂 )

 

IMG_7347

 

**********

 

For me it’s an endless pleasure to gaze at these tiny white spring flowers.

Here are more snowdrops…..

 

IMG_7334

 

Nature’s Delicate Side

With icy and snowy landscapes greeting me as I look out the windows, I sometimes go poking through older photos with some of them taken in the warmer seasons…..just for that occasional break.

I came across these two last night.

 

*****

 

january-1-2016-fanned-grass

 

In a patch of downtrodden grass

Stands a sentinel.

Reaching tall….reaching for the sun’s warmth.

A splayed fan of fine, grassy wisps at the top.

In a burst of bright green,

Saying, “I am here!”

 

********************

 

january-13-2016-photo-2-bleeding-hearts-from-may-2015

 

Little girl in white

With a bouffant of pink hair;

Dancing with a friend.

 

********************

 

The first photo was taken during a visit at a wildlife reserve in August 2015 up in the Yukon.  Our group had walked over to where some caribou were grazing in their sufficiently large area – we could watch them with a wired fence between us – and in between taking photos of the caribou, I also found some other beauties in this spot….like that little grassy shoot.

*****

The second photo was taken of bleeding hearts blooms in the front bed of my garden in the spring of 2015.  I had actually waited too long, and many of the fuller clusters had already passed the height of their generous blooming time.