Summer Evening Paddling Trip

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A call of a loon;

Quiet splashing, rhythmic sounds,

Kayak glides along.

 

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Yesterday’s warm temperatures and sunshine beckoned.

So, following the family supper, some of us embarked on an evening’s paddle.  Well, as many as could fit into two canoes and a single-person kayak.  😀

We launched our craft onto Taylor Lake and eventually made it to the channel leading to adjacent Clayton Lake….and ultimately the village of Clayton where we finished just as it was getting dark.

It’s a lovely paddling excursion….usually taking about two hours.

There are quite a few cottages along the shores of Taylor Lake, with avid boaters and fishing enthusiasts sharing the water….and everyone respecting the speeds near other boaters.  By contrast, Clayton Lake is quieter.

We were lucky and were treated to multiple loon calls, the sighting of a loon family of three, and a pretty sunset.

Here are some more photos…

 

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A juvenile loon…

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Sunset on Taylor Lake

From the time the sun was just touching the top of the trees to my extracting my iPhone from the protective plastic box tucked inside my life vest and then going for a photo, as you can see the sun went into hiding – moved so fast! Anyway….still looks pretty over the water like that.

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Kayaking is a lot of fun!

(Good time to add in a selfie….)  😀

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On Clayton Lake

I took a photo of the view behind me with the pretty clouds and the pinks and purples…..getting darker fast.

 

 

 

 

 

Six Word Story #14

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Sky-filled darkened clouds create dramatic expectation!

 

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On my walk last week.

Fascinating how looking to the west at one point sets the mood for something….that pause in the air.  What might happen!

And then 10 minutes further down the road.  I look toward the east, and it’s an entirely different light and mood.

 

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Cloud and Sky Watching

So fascinating how in one day, one can look up at the sky and see such diversity in cloud formations as well as the colour of the sky!

These three photos were taken at just a few hours apart, when I was out visiting a friend yesterday – the first two being also within a few kilometres of each other, and the last one  near another town (some 30 kms away).

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What caught my eye – when I was looking facing east around 1:15 p.m.-  was the two-tone blue colouring of the sky.  I don’t recall ever seeing one part of the sky being a pale blue and the other such a deeply, rich blue.  It looks as if the atmosphere closer to the earth is reflecting that lighter shade of blue.  And looking up into the higher atmospheric levels, the blue becomes darker in hue.  Usually, when looking at the sky, it tends to be one shade all across.  Unusual, don’t you think?

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I snapped this next photo – around 3:30 p.m. (facing west) – because this cloud looked so MASSIVE and had such interesting features to it.  Tufts here, splays there, some in-curling to be seen at the bottom.  It was only when I looked at it again just now that my imagination kicked in and I spied a sea creature in it.  Mind you, it’s many, many times larger than in real life!  Haha!

 

 

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Do you see a crab?  Upright?  With its two claws on either side at the top and its many small feet at the bottom end?

A crab cloud!

 

 

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And finally a view at around 4:45 p.m. (looking west again)….

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The sky is fairly clear of clouds outside of the one solid wall of cloud on the right, and it’s nestled right down to the horizon level.  Here the sun is still able to peek along the top.  And it’s back to the one unified shade of blue for the sky.

Once again a spectacular sky show!

Tourist Moments #3

On my trip in July of 2007 to the South Island of New Zealand – on the occasion of my girlfriend’s wedding – her daughter, Emily, and I took off one free afternoon to go on a mini-excursion.

We came upon this nifty looking, wooden Maori carving – quite TALL – which is located at the Karaka Point Historic Reserve  (a short drive outside of Picton).

 

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This look-out point offers up a spectacular view of part of the Marlborough Sounds area.

The following sequence of photos gives you a somewhat panoramic glimpse into these beautiful sounds.

 

 

 

The clouds and waves that day created a bit of dramatic ambiance.

I looked up some added information for you.

Online the site, 100% Pure New Zealand, describes the Marlborough Sounds as follows:

“Marlborough Sounds is a collection of ancient sunken river valleys filled with the waters of the Pacific Ocean. Forested hills rise steeply from the sea around an intricate coastline of sheltered inlets and sandy bays. The area has three main bodies of water – Queen Charlotte, Kenepuru and Pelorous Sounds. The Department of Conservation manages over 50 reserves in this scenic playground.”

 

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There are grassy areas where one can walk about and enjoy the views.  I imagined what it would be like to walk all the way to the end of that huge outcropping.

 

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And finally, included is the sign as well.   😀

 

 

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Another Window to our World

In a tiny brief post on a fellow blogger’s page, I just now discovered this link….and wow!

Almost passed it by….

I’m glad I decided to peek instead. 😀

It will open up another window to our world for you.

It’s such a gorgeous ride with spectacular views….I urge you to have a look….and enjoy! ❤😀

 

 

This is the link to the blog post, which originally caught my attention….

 

And this is the subsequent link to the blog post by Karim Iliya, who created this beautiful film.

Would you make up your mind already?

February 2nd was noteworthy.

Not only because of the fickleness of our wintry weather – I have witnessed it a few times in the past month, actually – no….but also because I decided to take some photos to record the strangeness of it.

All within a matter of  only minutes, the scenery would change….and then change again!

In the late morning of Feb. 2nd, I went out to do some errands.  Bright sunshine beating down.  Blue sky.  The sparkle of white snow in the fields and along the roadside.

As I was driving back towards home, I noticed that the sky was turning back to grey with clouds blocking out the sun.

 

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Only another kilometre and a half further……

….no more sunshine and back to that blanket of grey clouds.

And the wind joined in by blowing and swirling snow across the road….

 

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….as well as down our country road.

 

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After I parked the car and got inside, I hunkered down all nice ‘n cozy and checked for messages.

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Now within a mere ten minutes – I kid you not! – I glanced outside.  What ?!?!

I went back out to take photos of these next three views!

 

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…..the only way one can make shadows is with the aid of the sunshine, yes?

 

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It truly felt as if that grey period hadn’t happened!

 

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So, feeling all gleeful again, I went back inside.

 

Ten minutes later……

…..sigh……

 

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Yep….a few more minutes later, and everything was grey everywhere again with lots of snow falling down.  Lots of flakes.  Big flakes.

Except by that point, I stubbornly refused to go back outside and take photos.

So, you’ll just have to imagine it, okay?

 

 

Time Lapse of the Northern Lights

National Geographic Photographers have captured this beautiful phenomenon and set it in time lapse mode…..as seen in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada.

 

To me the Northern Lights are Earth’s original light show…and I am always entranced and fascinated by the dancing celestial colours.

I have been lucky a couple of times over the years to get to see more modest displays of dancing celestial colours here in Ontario, Canada.  Usually, the colours were green or white; once it was a fainter red colour.  In every case, it was quite late at night – into the next morning – and always lovely to watch.

 

 

 

Winter Sunsets

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The coolness of snow,

And the blues of cloud and sky;

Softened with sunshine.

 

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I took both of these wintry sunset photos about three days apart.  One can sky-gaze every day and never see the same view twice.

Nature’s endlessly tantalizing and fun show!

It feels good to see the blanket of snow everywhere – things are getting a good rest.

 

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Mindblowing Aerial 3D Panoramas

I just came across this post in my notifications, and as I was browsing through these images, I decided that I just HAD to share them.
Come and discover these amazing, beautiful, creative, artistic….mind-blowing aerial 3D photographs by AirPano….and originally blogged by ALK3R.
ENJOY!

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AirPano is a not-for-profit project created by a team of Russian photo enthusiasts focused on taking high-resolution aerial panoramic photographs. Being the largest resource for 360° aerial panoramas in the world

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In Praise of the Tamarack

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Green in the summer,

Its needles turn bright yellow,

Then drop completely.

 

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Do you know the tamarack?

It’s a coniferous tree that grows abundantly in Canada.

Tamaracks are among my favourite trees!

Once the many deciduous trees have impressed us with their spectacular fall dresses and then shed them, these modest trees – known as deciduous conifers, also called Tamarack (from Algonquian) and larch, suddenly explode into vibrant yellow colour!

They are the only conifers in Canada whose needles change colour and also get dropped!  I have been enthralled with these trees ever since I first learned of their unique quality years ago, when one of our older neighbours, Ross, told me about them.

I love seeing these yellow lovelies along all the country roads I drive these days, when everything else begins to look more brown and grey and bare, before winter sets in.

 

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Note:  The word tamarack is the Algonquian name for the species and means “wood used for snowshoes.”